CHOICES

CHOICES

We all have them. Each new day presents a multitude of opportunities that require choices. Being free is a privilege and having freedom grants us the right to choose. Every day, we make the decision to get out of bed, what clothes to wear and what to eat for breakfast. We get to decide on how to wear our hair, on what to read during that long commute, where to have lunch and which place to grab a coffee to go. Choices are a constant responsibility bestowed on each and every one of us that own that right. Not only do our daily routines rely on them, every being and business that surrounds us also heavily rely on the actions we take to choose as well. You walk into a paint store with the idea in mind that you want to paint your living room blue. Not royal, navy or cobalt, but more of a diluted, grayish blue. As your eyes scan the rows of every shade of blue you could possibly envision, you finally manage to narrow it down to four solid possibilities. You're a bit surprised at your contenders since none of them are what you initially set out for but then again you couldn't have known you'd be faced with so many more variations of a single color. After much internal debate and side-by-side squinting, you confidently decide on a final hue. You get home, put your task in motion, feeling satisfied with your tonal choice and by the time you peel off the painter's tape and take a step back to review your progress you start to wonder if you should have gone with option B. 

How, then, can we ever truly feel confident with the choices we make when we are offered so many of them, in all shapes and sizes, colors, tastes, smells, textures and promises. Would our lives be simpler if it were between this or that, not that and those? But then again, would any of us really want to lose the privilege of endless options now that we know all too well how great "unlimited" can be, even when it's not? Having to make the "right" choice, whether it's between ice cream flavors or physicians, can spark full-on panic attacks for an unfortunate few, inciting the importance of the mere individual responsibility each of us face daily in order just to function. It doesn't help (or it does, depending on personal stance) that as our resources continue to grow along with supply and demand, so do our choices. For the large group of people that must be coaxed into making decisions, or severely educated on what products to choose will continue to face the everyday task in practicing this right with abandon. 

There is no way to tell when it comes to the choices we must make and whether or not they will be right or wrong. As with any decision we make in life, we can only rely on what we do know to be true, and only we can determine that for ourselves. Do we like a specific fashion brand because our peers say we should, or more because we like the way it fits our body and because it's unique--making us, then, feel unique. Do we go to the Hamptons every weekend because so-and-so does, even though we secretly prefer quiet, woodsy, less-talked-about Woodstock? We must succumb to certain decisions in order to appease others, it's inevitable. For the remaining choices we have, the ones meant to serve a more personal service like whether to stick to Hanes tees or try that new brand promising more advanced cotton--well, why not give the newbie a whirl. If you wind up hating the decision you made you'll come out of it having learned something (like, you really do love Hanes) about yourself and next time you'll stick to what's tried and true. That's the real beauty of having choices. Without them there'd be no affirmation of what or whom we've truly come to love and appreciate in our lifetimes.