GLORIOUS NOSTALGIA

GLORIOUS NOSTALGIA

New York Fashion Week officially has a pulse once again in our frozen city, provoking the masochistic style-set to don their highest heels, showiest garb, and camera-ready faces to invade Lincoln Center--ice and subzero temps be damned. There's always an exciting array of burgeoning designers set to debut their first collections alongside the more distinguished, seasoned vets. Fashion week is an interesting juxtaposition to say the least. Seven day's worth of bustling parties, eight minute runway shows that took at least fifteen months to prep, preteen bloggers that traded desperate favors to sit four rows back, and fashion editors with tenure and front row seats that would rather be anywhere else. And let's not forget the big kerfuffle of in-your-face advertising campaigns that now flood the over-crowded mingling grounds of Lincoln Center. Truth be told; NYFW can be an absolute shit-show. And this season is sure to be no exception. 

It's hardly breaking news that many esteemed designers have moved their shows far away from The Tents to lesser known studios and airy lofts about town, to avoid the unwanted chaos and put the attention back to where it's intended--on their latest collections. Milk Studios, The Highline, ports at Chelsea Piers; they're all booked up solid right about now. While a major show in Lincoln Center's Theater should definitely be experienced at least once, these unconventional spaces offer a more professional and chic atmosphere with a rather covert disposition. We applaud any creative individual that chooses a singular, unique path to unveil their artistic expression. It is with this offering, that we'd like to take a short second to pay homage to a truly great designer with undeniable talent and un-forsaken accomplishments. Let us take a moment to remember the exquisite works of the late Alexander McQueen

Lee McQueen was a complicated, tormented, genuinely kind, reclusive, exceptional artist. He was born in London and fine tuned his tremendous bespoke skills alongside the very best tailors on the incomparable Savile Row. Those that were fortunate enough to personally know McQueen and call him a friend, were also fortuitous in getting to witness his magic up close. The designer's runway shows were like no other. He singlehandedly brought supermodel Kate Moss back from career ostracization after her alleged cocaine scandal, by featuring her as an angelic hologram, spinning in heavenly white sashes as if to rise from the dead, deservingly putting her back at the very top of her game. This most memorable event closed McQueen's climactic runway show in Paris, 2006. A year after his death, The Metropolitan Museum of Art beautifully showcased the designer's most incredible creations for their annual Met Gala and Fashion Exhibition, garnering one of the most successful exhibits the museum has ever held. Savage Beauty has since gone on to show in London, and memorabilia of the exhibit from books to photographs are still being sold across the world for a pretty penny. 

What makes McQueen so unique and such a historical figure in fashion and art is undoubtedly his skill-set, yes, but also because he pushed boundaries in the industry. He pushed fun, shocking, inspired boundaries and wasn't afraid to do so, while so many of his talented peers were playing it safe. McQueen gave his party guests exactly what they came to see: a fashion show built around performance art and pure originality, without taking an ounce away from the impeccable clothes. We will forever miss his work in this vastly changing industry. Most importantly, we will always be grateful for what he did for fashion, and how his work will continue to encourage both existing and up-and-coming designers to really, genuinely bring It for generations to come.