MILLIONS MARCH

MILLIONS MARCH

Since the beginning of mankind, racism has been upon us all. We are each taught from a young age that there are people like us, and then there are those exorbitantly different. Some of us grow into our own adopted feelings and beliefs, leaving those ideas enforced on us by our elders or peers behind to fester within their own constraints. It takes enormous guts, knowledge, and a wealth of learned acceptance to be yourself in this world; to not only form your own beliefs about people and society and hold them close to your chest, but to share them with the rest of the world too. There isn't a single living person with mature comprehension that hasn't witnessed some acting form of racism in this lifetime, whether it's inflicted towards you, or through expected participation towards another. Even as society evolves tremendously with greater acceptance of gender roles, sexual affiliations, marriage equality, religion, and so forth, our nation remains stuck in ancient times of the law and the black man. 

Police brutality against black men in America is at an all-time high. Eric Garner and Michael Brown were unarmed when they were each killed on two separate routine stops by New York and Missouri policemen. Both policemen were tried in a court of law and found not guilty. These two cases are the most recent in decades-old events wherein police brutality has favored black communities across America with zero judicial consequences thereafter. How could we as a nation come so far, yet remain stuck in civil rights era times where the law bends with the color of your skin. 

It's an honest assumption that the vast majority of our government and law enforcers have deeply dug their dated heels in American soil, determined with all of their ancient might to never let go of the past the rest of us so desperately hope to rid ourselves of for a stronger, better future for all. We've elected a black man to be our President--twice. We've voted for marriage equality across the nation, and filled our Congress with not only women, but openly gay members. The majority of us will not stand for any more prejudice within our justice system, nor police brutality from those that have promised to protect and serve, not collect the lives of the innocent and walk away unscathed.

This past Saturday, on 12-13-14, tens of thousands New Yorkers gathered in Union Square to march through the NYC streets to take a unanimous stand against police brutality and raise acute awareness towards racial profiling within the law. I've never, in my 35 years seen anything quite like this. A calm, even jovial sea of people of all walks of life and colors walked together from lower Manhattan to midtown, over to Brooklyn and back to the city, chanting in unison, carrying handmade signs, messages, peace and purpose. What began as a most unfortunate series of unfair events has resulted in a nation united as our forefathers intended, to take a stand together and let it be known that black lives matter too. We are all in this together after all, regardless of the side of the equality line we stand on.