STILL LIFE

STILL LIFE

In the midst of the 70's, fashion most certainly was having a glorious revolution. Along with sun-kissed west coast starlets like Farrah Fawcett and Suzanne Somers, supermodels and sexier-than-thou fashion were all on the dramatic rise towards game-changing popularity and a consistent status quo. Basically, times were ripe for a rather unique and creative mannequin artist. 

Ralph Pucci pounced on an untapped market and so his mannequin business was born. But his was a more atypical approach to life-size dolls. Pucci, along with in-house sculptor Michael Evert, heavily drew diverse inspiration from Greek and Roman sculptures, 70's rock band New York Dolls and many influencers in the fashion industry from designers (Anna Sui; DVF), architects (Philippe Starck), artists (Kenny Scharf) and of course, supermodels (Christy Turlington). The ending results consisted of a wide array of artistic silhouettes depicting both real body sizes (no size 2, three-rib statues here!) and/or creatively fluid and abstract poses. Pucci's mannequins were designed to wear clothes well and with personality, unlike all of the other bodyforms on the market that were blank, stark and of deeply unrealistic proportions. Because of this, Pucci's creations were exclusively chosen to fill the windows and displays of the higher-end department stores from Bergdorfs to Barneys, and were a favorite for Calvin Klein. 

Currently on exhibit since the very end of March 2015 and closing in exactly one month on August 30th, Ralph Pucci: The Art of the Mannequin at Museum of Arts and Design in New York is a must-see show.   

"Olympian Goddess" by Ralph Pucci.