RACQUETBALL, ANYONE?

RACQUETBALL, ANYONE?

Fitness and pushing the body to exert fluid energy has immeasurable health benefits; everyone is keenly aware. But some sports might just be more beneficial than others, depending on the person at play. Debuting just a few short years ago in '69, the indoor sport grew feverishly in popularity during the 70s and 80s, but fell slightly out of the limelight as younger generations set their sights on more pop-culture based sports revolving around pro players like basketball and tennis. Racquetball shouldn't be forgotten nor diminished, however, for the rewards reaped from this particular form of exercise along with the fun to be had are rather profound

For starters, racquetball can be played all year long as the game takes place in a single walled-off indoor court. Very little equipment is required, sans for goggles, comfortable shoes and a short, light stringed racket and small, hollow rubber ball. A one-hour game burns more calories than that of circuit training, aerobics, tennis and is the equivalent to running two miles at top speed. The mental clarity and think-quick-act-quick cerebral motions required to carry out a solid round of racquetball greatly improves mental stability and the body's natural reflexes as well as flexibility and agility. After many regular rounds of racquetball, newly minted players start to notice that their hand-eye coordination and balance of the body becomes sharper and more consistent, even off the court. Most importantly however, racquetball is ultimately fun, as partakers can be as serious or ridiculous as they deem necessary, and the sport forces every player to think quick and act faster, which for beginners, requires a lot of laughs

May we also point out that the traditional favored racquetball uniform almost always required sweat bands for the head and wrists as well as somewhat fitted clothing for speedier moves, so tell us, what's not to love here? For those in the NYC area itching to find a court we like the New York Health & Racquet Club located on Whitehall Street. Now get out there and cause a roaring "racket" for the sake of your body, mood, and ever-present stress

Ready to hit the court (wool layers not required): Luke Wilson in Wes Anderson's, The Royal Tenenbaum's